Experienced and New: A Review of Appraiserfest 2018

Originally posted at :

http://appraisersblogs.com/experienced-n-new-appraiserfest-review

Experienced and New: A Review of Appraiserfest 2018
By Tom Horn, SRA and Woody Fincham, SRA, AI-RRS, RAA Member of RAC

A Newbie Conference Attendee’s Take on Appraiserfest 2018
Tom Horn, SRA

I just got back from the first ever Appraiserfest conference, held in San Antonio, Texas, and while it is fresh on my mind I thought I would share my thoughts. This is my first national appraisal conference to attend and I have to say it did not disappoint.

I have been an appraiser for quite a while but have never been interested in spending my money or time to attend a conference that was not close by where I live. This may be the same way other appraisers think also but I hope this article gives you some insight into what happens at one of these conferences and what you can get out of it.

One analogy that I have heard about appraisers, and one that was mentioned at the conference, is that we are very similar to lone wolves. Many of us work by ourselves and we do not get a chance to talk with other appraisers whenever we need another professional’s opinion.

Ithink one of the messages that the conference wanted to get across is that appraisers must try and shake off this mentality. We must try and go from lone wolves to a pack of wolves. It is only through this transition that we will be able to affect change at the national level because there is strength in numbers.

This change can start at the most basic level, like that offered by social media groups. One of these groups that comes to mind is the 100% Appraiser Group, started and ran by appraiser Mark Skapinetz. I truly believe that this conference would not have been as strong as it was without the camaraderie that this group has built, or at least the friendships that appraisers have developed online.

The natural progression of these online friendships is to move them offline and in person. Taking this a step further these relationships also develop into state appraisal coalitions that have been so effective over the past several years. Again, when appraisers work together like this it becomes a more effective method for communicating with government officials to get things changed in a positive way for the appraisal industry.

The underlying themes for Appraiserfest 2018 included:

  1. Finding alternative forms of appraisal work that do not involve lenders
  2. Making yourself the local expert by analyzing the market and reporting your findings to other local real estate professionals
  3. Being aware of antitrust laws so that you stay out of trouble
  4. Learning as much as you can about your state appraisal laws in order to avoid mortgage fraud
  5. Educating ourselves on the new technologies such as blockchain so that we can position ourselves as valuation experts
  6. Staying on top of the main economic indicators so that we can plan for market changes in our businesses
  7. Learning how to use social media to our advantage in order to grow our non lender business and finally
  8. Thinking differently about the current real estate appraisal model by providing value to consumers by helping them manage the equity of their largest asset, their home.

In addition to getting value from the above noted curriculum the ‘fest also provided great value in other ways also. The friendships that were built online were taken offline and strengthened even more. While I don’t have any other national appraisal conference to compare it to I have attended regional or local get togethers and this was much different.

This gathering had a special vibe to it because everyone seemed to already have a bond with each other because of their online communications. It was this aspect of the ‘fest that I believe sets it apart from all others.

A very special part of the weekend involved a ceremony that honored all of the appraisers that had served in the military. Each of their names were displayed on the big screen and they were all given medals. This was an emotional time for everyone attending.

Everyone in the group has a genuine love for appraising and the desire to continue providing value and help to consumers, because without an unbiased third party involved in the mortgage transaction this could negatively affect the national economy.

So, my final thought about Appraiserfest 2018 is that I would definitely attend another one because the value received was so much more than the cost and time involved and the 14 hours of continuing education doesn’t hurt either. If I can answer any questions about attending the ‘fest feel free to contact me.

An Experienced Conference Attendee’s Perspective
Woody Fincham. SRA, AI-RRS, RAA Member of RAC

Appraiserfest 2018 has ended. I admit it, I was a skeptic that it would ever happen. Not only did it happen but is was an astonishing success.

Wow, what an experience. I think all of us that attended had a bit of withdrawal when we got home. This is one of many valuation conferences that I have attended in my career. It was certainly different than most. This was my sixth and final one this year. Appraiserfest is a different beast than what most appraisers would be familiar with. It is not just one stuffy panel after another. Pretentiousness was checked at the door and we were all simply appraisers working towards a single goal. That goal being successful valuation practice.

Starting out, the energy was vibrant.  Everyone that attended expressed how much positive energy they felt there. In a time where residential appraisers feel isolated and preyed upon by lenders, AMCs and GSEs, this conference helped turn some frowns upside down. The networking was excellent. I was able to meet many appraisers that I have emailed with or spoken to on the phone or exchanged correspondence with over social media. It was great to shake hands and get hugs from folks I have befriended over the last few years.

The introductions that were done included music, video and lots of pumping up the crowd. The leadership that put together the fest did it right. Phil Crawford has a great ability to interact with the crowd, very personable. Mark Skapinetz “Skap” is well…Mark, it is hard not to love the guy. They keep saying this is a “Happening”, it was more like a “Skapening”. He is certainly a genuine person who wants to see good things happen for all of us as professionals. Lori Noble, as we say in the south, was certainly the belle of the ball. Everyone, Phil and Mark included, had such wonderful things to say about her and it seems she was the glue holding much of it together. These three deserve all the accolades for getting this thing to work.

A personal highlight for me was being able to sit on a leadership panel with Mike Ford, Maureen Sweeney, George Dell, John Russell, Jonathan Miller and Jim Park. It was neat to see the crowd from the stage. It was a perspective only a few of us got. The biggest take away for me sitting up there: Appraiserfest is a diverse group. The number of women appraisers that attended seems much higher in comparison to other conferences that I have attended. That is great!

Over the next couple of days there were a slew of great presenters and lots of networking. I walked away with dozens of business cards. That is always a great thing about attending conferences and classes in person.  You can meet folks and not feel like you are an island unto yourself. Many of us are single appraiser entities and we forget that there is strength in fellowship and unity. I mean the Fest even brought David Samnick back to the 100% Appraiser Facebook page. Many missed his “As the Liver Turns” posts, I am glad to see that he is back as well.

I will certainly be attending the next one, and I hope to be a part of the leadership and presenters again. I do hope to see a larger cross section of the profession at the next one. I was surprised at the absence of the Appraisal Institute. This was a large gathering of residential appraisers and this would have been a great platform for the AI to reach out and talk with the boots on the ground appraisers out there. Maybe next year.

So now you have a new conference attendee’s perspective from my friend, Tom Horn. (By the way, I had never met Tom in person, it was great to finally do so.) He liked what he saw at the Fest. You have my perspective from a veteran conference attendee, and I have no issue saying it is unlike anything else out there. It is worthy of your time and resources to attend next year.

The Queen of Green

July 6, 2018

 

sandy picture
Courtesy of Sandra Adomatis

Sandra K. Adomatis, SRA, LEED Green Associate, NAR GREEN Designee has been a meaningful member of the valuation profession for many years.  I first met Sandy when I was taking the last class and demonstration alternative for my SRA designation.  Sandy was the facilitator for that week.  I was immediately impressed with her knowledge, astuteness and love for valuation.  There was no doubt that she loves the profession and believes in doing it the right way.  She is a great instructor, one of the best there is in my opinion.

Sandy has been a thought leader in the profession, most notable in sustainable residential technology.  She is the foremost authority in valuing residential solar PV systems and has been crucial in assisting the Appraisal Institute in developing the Residential Green and Energy Efficient Addendum.  She has also authored a book, Residential Green Valuation Tools, which is a must have for any valuer’s library. She is also a developer and course writer for several classes including the green series.  I have had the pleasure to work with her on a team that she led that focused on extracting a premium for PEARL home certifications which was published in a report here.

On a personal note, there are few valuation professionals that I hold in a higher esteem.  I am thankful to her for being a mentor to me, and for helping me along in my career.  Just to share one quick story about what a good person that she is:

My wife and I have a son that has some special needs.  Sandy met my two youngest children (twins, a boy and a girl) and my wife when she came to Charlottesville to teach the green classes a few years ago.  My twins have since nicknamed her “Sandy Starfish”. Our son has been in a facility moist of this year to help with some of his issues and when Sandy found out she started sending him correspondence by mail.  That meant the world to him, and to my wife and me.

So that is the setup for a Valuer’s Dozen that I am most proud to publish.  Ladies and gentlemen, the Queen of Green, Sand Adomatis:

 

VN:  How long have you been in the profession?

SA: I started appraising in 1981 after two years working for a builder, 1 year for a retrofit contractor, and 1 year managing an appraisal business.

 

VN: What is your favorite thing about the profession?

SA: Appraising is a puzzle that offers a new picture and challenge with each assignment.  As a certified general appraiser working many years with my MAI husband, I had the privilege of inspecting a wide variety of properties from nudist camp, farms, adult toy store, railroad right-of-way, 16,000 sq ft houses on the Gulf to 800 square foot cookie cutters.  How many people can say their job is that diverse?  Not only have I learned much about appraising methodology but have also met many interesting people and learned lots about businesses.

 

VN: Who are your mentors and idols within the profession?

SA: My biggest mentor is my husband, Richard Adomatis, MAI.  He has been retired for more than 25 years but has a great mind and has not forgotten the business.  I can still discuss an appraisal problem today and get direction or suggestions that lead me in the right direction.

I don’t have any idols in the profession, but I have several people I truly respect and admire.  They are all Appraisal Institute members and to name a few – Maggie Hambleton, SRA; Tim Runde, MAI; Kathy Coon, SRA; Scott Robinson, MAI, SRA; Donald Boucher, SRA; and even you Woody.

 

 

VN: What are some of your passions inside the profession?

SA:My passion for the profession is to see more young people come into the profession with a desire to be the best they can be.  That means learning as much as you can and looking to be more than a mortgage lending appraiser.  There is so much work out there that pays well outside the mortgage lending world.

Appraisers that specialize in mortgage lending work have a challenge going forward with low fees, increasing regulations and guidelines, and automated valuation models that will take away the easy assignments.

My passion is to see more appraisers learn about the green features that are beginning to become code in many markets on the residential and commercial side.  I’ve been on this track of learning all I can about the buildings science and dedicating much of my time in sharing what I’ve learned.  Our professional is so slow to move in a direction that is not the norm and sometimes don’t see the train until it is upon them.  I’ve recently been engaged in working with appraisers in three states that are very green and learned that we still have lots of education needs to bring our profession up to speed.

 

VN: What are some passions of yours outside of the profession?

SA: My passion outside of the industry include photography and spending time with family.  Photography is a hobby and I enjoy doing photo shoots for high school graduates that do not have the funds to buy the expensive photographs from the school.   I’ve done prom pictures for some of these students as well.  Little kids are really a pleasure to photograph.  My children and grandchildren are getting older now, but they gave me lots of joy in photographing them as they played.  I did the formal event photographs for the Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club for about 10 years.  (My photography is all volunteer because I love it.)

 

VN: Where do you see the profession in 3 years?  5 years?  10 years?

SA: In 3 years I do not expect major changes in the profession.  In 5 year, we will begin to see more AVMs taking the simple assignments for the mortgage lending work.   We’ll begin to see more appraisers leaving the business due to age and loss of mortgage work if they have not prepared for other client types.

In 10 years, the databases will be incredibly different, larger, and yet still lacking important data needed to truly understand the more complicated property types.  This means appraisers with skills in complex assignments will always have a space in the real estate transaction.

 

VN: What is one thing about your personal business that you are most proud?

SA: My personal business has flourished over the last 25 years.  I’ve seen some appraisers in my market move to other areas or take government jobs because they could not survive during the lean years.  Fortunately, my mentor taught me to  diversify and have a variety of clients.  He also taught me to find a niche that no one else is filling and be the champion.  That is how I gained the title “Green Queen.”

 

VN: If you could change one thing about your business model what would it be?

SA: If I could change my business model it would be to have brought a couple trainees along 10 years ago.  I’ve worked with assistants that were very good and made a difference in the work I could handle.  As I move toward the winding down years of my career (last 10 years) I could see another 10 beyond that if I had a couple trained appraisers that were younger and dedicated.

 

VN:  What are some present goals for you and what you do are doing in the valuation space?

SA: I have a goal of writing another book in 2019.  I’ve got a start on it and hope to have one finished by end of next year.

My current work locally is appraising for estate, divorce, listing, or consulting clients.  I do some governmental work for right of way projects as well.  My consulting falls into the space of builders and real estate agents that need help in marketing, preparing for an appraisal or challenging an appraisal of a high performance (green) property.

Much of my time is spent writing courses, seminars, and teaching or speaking on high performance properties or features.  Some local appraisers hire me to do the solar PV valuations because they have not taken the classes and need the assistance.

 

VN:   If you could change one thing in valuation, what would it be?

SA: The image.   There are 77,000 licensed appraisers in the US and far too many do not present a professional image to the people they serve.  We are in a service business and we must take the time to do our work well and to serve the people we call our clients.  If we tell them we’ll have a report in 5 days, do it.  Why do appraisers think they only need to take the number of classes needed to get the required CE?  What does this say about our dedication to be the best we can be?

 

VN:  What advice would you give someone just getting in the profession?

SA: If you plan on making this profession a career, take quality education and work under an appraiser with a good reputation.  Take pride in your work and find a space where you can specialize and learn everything you can about it.

Network with other professionals and organizations that will add to your knowledge base, skills, and potential clients.  Attending meetings and educational offerings by right of way organizations, attorney education, and building science classes are just a few of the ways I’ve found were most helpful in gaining a presence in the space I wanted to serve.

 

VN: This last one is for you to discuss or talk about whatever you would like.

SA: I love my profession and I want to see everyone in this business love it like I do.  We need to work together to make it what we want it to be.  The low fees we accept can only be changed by appraisers.  Charge what you are worth.  I am not on sale today and I am not a .org.  Keep that in mind when the next client calls.

*****

I hope that you all enjoyed this one.  I am getting lots of great feedback on this series and I consider it a success already.  Please keep the suggestions coming.

Valuer’s Dozen, The Skapinetz

I am starting a new series for Valuation Nation, called The Valuer’s Dozen.  It is a spotlight piece on individual appraisers that are of note to the profession. I am excited that our very first spotlight will be an appraiser out the Atlanta, Georgia MSA.  Mark Skapinetz.  Mark has become quite the celebrity within the residential space over the last couple of years.  He started and administrates a very popular Facebook page, called 100% Real Estate Appraisers.  This is a well run private group that allows appraisers to share information.  Recently, Mark has also helped found Appraiser Fest, which is a new conference that is happening this November in San Antonio.  Welcome, Mark!!

IMG_1971

Courtesy of Mark Skapinetz

VN:  How long have you been in the profession?

MS: I have been in the profession for 16-years.  I Started in New Jersey and I now practice in Georgia.

 

VN: What is your favorite thing about the profession?

MS: I like the ability to see how others live, see homes I could only dream of living in.  I like the flexibility I have and being able to work when I want and how hard I want to work.

 

VN: Who are your mentors and idols within the profession?

MS: I started in the business with George Stiuso in New Jersey as well as Jeffrey Michaels in New Jersey.  They both taught me a lot to get started with.  As far as idols I don’t have any, but I really look up to Jonathan Miller, Lori Noble, Ryan Lundquist, Phil Crawford, (You too, Woody) and Greg Wilkenson. All of them have contributed to where I am today, and all have different skill sets.  Its taking a little of everyone that has made me a better appraiser and a better person.

 

VN: What are some of your passions inside the profession?

MS: I love meeting new people and talking to them.  I’m very much a people person.  I like driving and exploring new areas and trying new places to eat and or trying new fun things in these areas.

 

VN: What are some passions of yours outside of the profession?

MS: Playing Softball, taking my dog Destiny to Dock Diving Competitions, traveling with the wife, and watching all sports.  I’ve recently gotten into Blogging and I am starting a new podcast.

 

VN: Where do you see the profession in 3 years?  5 years?  10 years?

MS: Honestly, I see turmoil if things don’t change.  So many are pushing for these new hybrid appraisals and desktops.  I think there is a divide now between those that support AMCs and alternative appraisals and those who support the appraiser and what they do.  There is no way to predict what the profession will be in 3 years or 5 or 10.  The whole damn thing can blow up again and then more changes will be made.  I think appraisers will always be needed as I think many people trust dealing with someone directly they can talk to other than a computer, but I do think appraisers will need to expand their businesses to doing other work than lender work if they will want to survive down the road.

 

VN: What is one thing about your personal business that you are most proud?

MS: That I have created a reputable company that people seek out.  I started at the bottom here in Atlanta and now have become a very successful company.

 

VN: If you could change one thing about your business model what would it be?

MS: I would take the time to expand it more, bring on some new people and grow it.

 

VN:  What are some present goals for you and what you do are doing in the valuation space?

MS: Well first I want to continue to grow and become a better appraiser.  Secondly, as you know I run the 100% Real Estate Appraiser Group on Facebook and I am looking to expand that possibly into another forum site, as well as starting the 100% Real Estate Appraiser Podcast.   Third, APPRAISERFEST. As one of the co-founders of the event I really want to make this first event in November a huge success.  If we can accomplish that we will continue to take the Fest to new levels each year as well as possibly run some smaller events.  Fourth, I want to continue to be a voice in the profession and use the group as well as my Blog, “The Peoples Appraisal Blog”  to continue to put out information on issues and help not only appraisers but consumers understand the things we face.

 

VN:   If you could change one thing in valuation, what would it be?

MS: USPAP being as big as the yellow pages.  It should be more simplified.  You said 1 but I have many other things as well.  Lol

 

VN:  What advice would you give someone just getting in the profession?

MS: Do your homework and research.  I would shadow someone for a couple days to make sure you really want to be in it.  The appraisal industry is changing and getting started today is a little more challenging.

 

VN: This last one is for you to discuss or talk about whatever you would like.

MS: EVERYONE REGISTER AT WWW.NOV123.COM FOR APPRAISESERFEST.  Also check out my Blog page www.thepeoplesappraisalblog.com and my website for my business www.whatsitworthapp.com

 

Well, there you have it folks.  Now we know a little bit more about one of our fellow valuers.  If you would like to be featured or want to suggest someone that should be, please send me an email.  wfincham@valucentric.com

 

Bracketing Unadjusted Sales Price, What’s the Deal?

June 20, 2018

Bracketing Unadjusted Sales Price, What’s the Deal?

I see posts every day on social media about bracketing.  It seems that many AMC reviewers and lenders have grabbed hold of bracketing to prove adjustments as the most important thing to do.  The posts are normally scathing and just short of wanting to tar and feather the clients.  I get the chagrin, appraisers are put under so much scrutiny anymore, and to have clients be so pushy about this topic shows the misunderstanding that many underwriters and non-appraisers have about it.

Bracketing

          A process in which an appraiser determines a probable range of values for a                property by applying qualitative techniques of comparative analysis to a                      group of comparable sales. The array of comparables may be divided into                    three groups—those superior to the subject, those similar to the subject, and              those inferior to the subject. The adjusted sale prices reflected by the sales                  requiring downward adjustment and those requiring upward adjustment                    refine the probable range of values for the subject and identify a value                          bracket in which the final value opinion will fall.

It can be a handy tool to utilize, but it is just a tool in a toolbox with many options.  In many cases, clients are starting to misunderstand why it’s a good tool and how to use for a reliable result.  Many of the client’s out there have preferred guidelines that have adopted bracketing as one of the most important things that an appraiser can offer for an analysis.  In some cases, I understand what they want, and I agree it can be a reliable way to look at things.  But it isn’t the best method out there in every situation.

Where I tend to have my own heartburn with it is with unadjusted sales prices.  Many clients want there to be enough comps in the report or analysis to bracket either side of the opinion of value, with the unadjusted sales prices of the comps being used.  This is not always possible, but some of these clients require the appraiser to add in an additional sale that will meet this preference no matter what.  Seems harmless enough, right?

There is a major concern that I have with this myopic way of looking at data.  Appraisers know, instinctively and expressly, that selecting comparable properties based just only on sales amount is not a good thing. If the only reason you select a property as a comparable is price, then you are ignoring what selecting comparability is all about.  In any other situation, if I told a client that I am selecting comps because of how much they sold for, I would get in some hot water, and fast.  You see, there is a certification in the 1004 that preempts appraisers from selecting sales like this.  The Fannie Mae 1004 form has a required Appraiser’s Certification printed on it:

  1. I selected and used comparable sales that are locationally, physically, and functionally the most similar to the subject property.

Fannie Mae wants the appraiser to use judgment when selecting comparable alternatives.  Judgement that rests on soundness and long held valuation theory.  We need to use properties that are comparable to the subject.  Not select a comparable based on something as arbitrary as what price it sold for when it closed. Why then, do clients (AMCs especially) require this type of preference?  I wish I could answer that, because the logic escapes me.

Bracketing is a relatively safe methodology to utilize when dealing property characteristics such as gross living area or bathroom counts.  It can act as a method to isolate market preference easily and can show that a property characteristic is typical or even ideal.  If you have a subject property that has all of it’s salient features falling squarely in the middle of the comps selected for the analysis, then you have a property with a relatively safe that it is neither inadequate or super adequate to market tastes.

I use bracketing when I can for property characteristics but expecting an appraiser to use it solely for pricing is not just bad technique. It is possibly requiring the appraiser to not follow the spirit of what Fannie Mae, FHA, VA, USDA and Freddie Mac want the appraiser to do.  I often hear colleagues state that it’s Okay to follow such requests.  “You don’t have to give that comp any weight”.  That seems like harmless advice, but it still doesn’t make it sound technique.

I would love to hear back from the clients that require this and understand the basis in economics or property theory that support it.  Maybe there is a good reason for it, but I have yet to speak with anyone that works at a lender or at an AMC that offer any insight into what it is about.  It seems like most AMCs simply require it because the lenders that hire them and say this is a requirement.  The AMCs simply obey and enforce it on appraisers.

I am not writing an anti-AMC post, but I am writing a pro-appraiser post.  This is one of many things I see in the day-to-day life of many appraisers and it is a worthwhile topic to inquire about.  Since so many of my clients require it, and I have yet to understand why this is such an important thing to do.  I would love some insight into it.  This becomes an especially difficult thing to accomplish on many of the assignments that I do because I do odd and unusual properties as a specialty.  In these types of assignments, I am often dealing with the only house like it and bracketing, even the simplest of property characteristics is hard to use bracketing on the analysis.

Whether it is in my case, a property that is unusual, or another appraiser’s situation where they are valuing a property in a four-model subdivision, it is simply choosing a sale to use as a comparable based solely on sales price.  Whether it is a directly or even indirectly competing property is irrelevant. It is simply asking an appraiser to appease a guideline that makes little sense at all.  If adding something to a report adds little to no credibility to an analysis, should it be added at all?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Valuer’s Personal Journey Entry 1

An Instructor’s Log:

I learn from You

June 20, 2018

At this juncture of my career, I am going on my 18th year of practice.  I have held my SRA designation with the  Appraisal Institute since 2011.I also hold my AI-RRS designation as well, and I am a member of RAC (Relocation Appraisers and Consultants).  I currently am the Residential Chief Appraiser and Vice President of Valucentric, LLC.

I dislike typing out my designations and positions.  Not because I am ashamed of them, but because it sometimes seems pretentious to list out my credentials.  I am not one to hang onto a credential and think that I am any better or less than anyone else that works in this profession.  I am proud of my accomplishments, but I still consider myself a serious learner.  Education and training and experience are still important for me to obtain.  I am on a journey with no real destination; I am a life-long learner.

As I am typing this, I am finishing up instructing an amazing class in Aurora, CO.  I have had the pleasure of facilitating a class for 24 designated members of the AI.  Residential Review Theory is a great class that normally has students that have lots of experience and much knowledge to share.  Taking a class like this is great as a student, but even more beneficial to the instructor.  I get to hear many students (over and over as I teach the class more often) share their own experiences, or “war stories” as we call them.

I get busy with my day to day tasks with work, home and my own personal stuff.  I get overwhelmed sometimes with it all.  Taking on the responsibilities of instructing is a major commitment, but the result for me is that I get a mental break from my daily grind.  I can focus my energy towards helping students earn a designation or assist them in broadening their knowledge.  It feels good to help others. That is why I am willing to travel around and do this.

One of the best things about being a part of the Appraisal Institute is that I can network and help others.  I have met some impressive folks that do all sorts of expert work in niche specialties.  I am floored by the talent and backgrounds that many of these professionals have.   I feel fortunate to meet many that I can call later and learn more about what they do and get guidance in my own work.

Being an instructor is a worthy thing to do for those that think they may want to do some of this type of work. It will make you better if for no other reason you must explain complex methods and concepts to a group of people.  You will find that while you may understand something well, you understand it even more when you can get 8 different learning styles to understand it.  Everyone looks at stuff from different perspectives and matching up to a room with 10 or 24 people, helps the instructor as much as it helps the student.

The best advice that I can give anyone that wants to instruct is that you must have a spirit of service to get anywhere.  If you are doing it solely for prestige: there is none. For the money: it pays well enough, but it doesn’t net out to where I can exist solely doing it. Or for any other reason than you want to help students you may want to use your time for something more financially rewarding.  Students appreciate the hard work that goes into preparing for and setting up a class.  It’s like anything, if you pour yourself into it, you will be successful.  They will recognize someone genuinely there to help them, versus someone that has other motives.

I am hoping that as I make it around to various classes, that I can keep you updated on my travels and adventures.  Adventures is a word that I use with some poetic license.  Those that know me will quickly say my adventures usually rotate around good food, good drink and enjoying the company of other professionals in the business.  I do get to see some cool things as well.

My good friend, Ben Davidson, MAI, SRA, AI-GRS, was gracious enough to take me up to Estes Park, CO to show me what real mountains look like.  I am not a heights guy, and we both enjoyed laughing at my fear of peering over a guardrail-less critical drop into one of the many valleys we drove by.  Being in a moving vehicle while I am staring at what will be my assured death.  All I could do is think, “I can see the news now: The remains of two real estate appraisers were found in the wreckage of a White Yukon last night.  The driver seemed to be laughing at the passenger who was yellow from fear.” It was a great experience to see the things that I saw on that drive, and I will be forever grateful to Ben for showing it to me.

 

Valuation Nation

This is the first entry to my new blog, Valuation Nation.  My hopes with this blog is to update stakeholders in the real estate valuation sector.  While I will cover almost anything valuation oriented, the impetus will be residential issues.  I am hopeful to attract other bloggers to guest blog occasionally, to cover relevant and recent news, and to write op eds regarding the profession.

We have several folks out there in the blogosphere that offer a similar publication.  I do hope that we can offer something balanced, unique and meaningful to the profession to the public at large.  I look forward to hearing from readers.  I do have to include a statement that my views expressed in this site are my own and do not reflect those of my employer or any organizations to which I am a member,

Welcome to the new blog.

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Woody Fincham, SRA, AI-RRS Member of RAC