Pat Turner, the Man with a Plan Valuer’s Dozen

by Woody Fincham, SRA, AI-RRS, RAA Member of RAC

pat turner

 

I have known Pat Turner for many years.  My first introduction to him was from attending a Virginia State Board meeting.  I had attended to give public commentary about the problems I saw with regulatory oversight in the commonwealth.  Pat and I struck up a conversation outside the meeting in the hallway where we discussed my disappointment with how the board looked at enforcement.  I explained to him that I was rather passionate about it.  To which he replied, ” Woody, if you have half the fight in you that I do about this profession, you will make some changes happen in the profession.”  If you know Pat at all, you know how true to his nature that reply really is.  Pat has led the charge in trying to advocate for the appraisal profession for many, many years. When I received my SRA designation Pat is the man that handed it to me, at my request.  That is how much think of him, and I know many that think highly of him as well.  I am proud to get the chance to share the Valuer’s Dozen with you, as Pat is one of my mentors and one of my friends.

VN:  How long have you been in the profession?

PT: 46.5 years

 

VN: What is your favorite thing about the profession?

PT:  I love the research and analyzing the actions of the market.

 

VN: Who are your mentors and idols within the profession?

PT: My mentors were:
Jim Faulconer, Chesterfield Assessor
Dick Farmer, Assessor of Henrico County and instructor for the Society of Real Estate Appraisers
Bob Barton, MAI and an instructor and friend
Woody Aaron, MAI, instructor and friend

 

VN: What are some of your passions inside the profession?

PT: My passion is to do the best I can in all that I undertake as an appraiser.  As you know, I am passionate about consumer protection and the appraisal profession as a whole.

 

VN: What are some passions of yours outside of the profession?

PT: My wife, children, grandchildren.  University of Richmond. My close friends because they know my many faults and like me anyway.

 

VN: Where do you see the profession in 3 years?  5 years?  10 years?

PT: In 3 years we will have new Fannie and Freddie reporting vehicles, if they are still viable.
In 5 years we appraisers better be getting more and better education because the mortgage part will be dissolving as we know it.  Take the best educational classes offered.  Be prepared for legal work, IRS work, work from accountants, etc.

 

VN: What is one thing about your personal business that you are most proud?

PT: Reputation and longevity, despite all the bumps along the way.

 

VN: If you could change one thing about your business model what would it be?

PT: Ban AMCs or at least make them more transparent regarding C & R fees.

 

VN:  What are some present goals for you and what you do are doing in the valuation space?

PT: My present goal is to assist my daughter to obtain her licenses.

 

VN:   If you could change one thing in valuation, what would it be?

PT: What would I change?  The lack of enforcement, which is due to insufficient knowledge of our profession, in my opinion.

 

VN:  What advice would you give someone just getting in the profession?

PT: Get the best education available.  Please use the LIVE classroom.  Join the American Society of Appraisers as they are rapidly becoming the representative for residential appraisers.

 

VN: This last one is for you to discuss or talk about whatever you would like.

PT:  Finally, I would recommend that people get involved.  Not only with our profession, but also social and civic activities.  Your personality and knowledge impress more people than you know.  Be a leader.  But if you can’t be a leader, then follow, or get out of the way.

ASA, AI, ASFMRA, MBREA, AGA RICS and Even NAR Step Up to the Plate for Valuers

Written by Woody Fincham, SRA, AI-RRS, RAA

Once again, we have some great news coming from the appraisal organizations. The American Society of Appraisers, Appraisal Institute American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers, MBREA|The Association for Valuation Professionals, American Guild of Appraisers, OPEIU, AFL-CIO and RICS signed off on a joint letter sent to the OCC, The Federal Reserve and the FDIC.  The organizations made a direct reference to the Economic Growth and Regulatory Paperwork Reduction Act (EGRPRA) which already addressed this issue less than two years ago where the agencies replied with:

“Based on considerations of safety and soundness and consumer protection, the agencies do not currently believe that a change to the current $250,000 threshold for residential mortgage loans would be appropriate. The agencies will continue to consider possibilities for relieving burden related to appraisals for residential mortgage loans, such as coordination of our rules with the practices of HUD, the GSEs, and other federal entities in the residential real estate market.”

The letter is worth a read and all appraisers should be aware that there has been real effort put forth by the organizations to help protect the importance of having an unbiased party available to vet mortgage transactions through appraisals.

In addition to this, the National Association of Realtors also chimed in with a letter in support of the pragmatic soundness of using professional appraisers.  One notable quote from the letter addresses the misconception of appraisal delays (underline emphasis mine):

“The Agencies note that increased cost burden is often the result of delays due to the lack of appraisal availability. NAR’s own research shows that the typical wait time for an appraisal in 2018 was seven days, with 63 percent of REALTORS® reporting wait times to be seven days or less. The question is whether that wait time is burdensome. When asked about ease of obtaining an appraisal, 67 percent of REALTORS® felt it was “easy” or “very easy” to get an appraisal and only one percent noted it being “difficult” or “very difficult.” Given the vast majority of REALTORS® feel getting an appraisal in their area is not a problem, it is hard to imagine that the wait time for an appraisal is resulting in a large number of cost-inducing delays. Based on the average appraisal costs and REALTOR® sentiment regarding appraisal wait time, NAR does not believe that appraisals are creating a cost burden on a national level, but that the problem is likely restricted to specific markets.”

Today has been an interesting one in the world of valuation.  Well done to all the organizations that have stood up for the public trust.  One can only hope that the agencies will listen to common sense.

The Valuer in The Mirror

Written by Woody Fincham, SRA, AI-RRS, RAA 

Maybe I am crazy, but I think all of us deserve a better profession as appraisers than what we have presently within the mortgage and lending world.  We are in an era where the profession is changing fast.  We have many players out there that want to limit or possibly eliminate real estate valuations for residential lending and to some degree on the non-residential side of things as well. The profession should be aligning itself to battle this, but we seem more fractured now than we have ever been.  There is too much in-fighting and disagreement among key players in the profession.  This ranges from the individuals that have appeared as leaders and with the organizations that make up the professional trade groups and professional membership organizations for real estate appraisers.

man-looking-in-mirror

The Valuer in The Mirror

The profession is fractured.  We need to take a long hard look at ourselves in the mirror.  We need to do it as individuals and as part of the various organizations out there.  We need to start seeing ourselves as we really are, warts and all.  There is not one organization out there that is going to save the valuation profession.  There is no one organization that is to blame for all the issues we deal with as a profession. Humans love to separate into groups and then immediately set upon the other groups out there as being somehow inferior to your group.

We have reached a point where we need to stop and take stock of what the profession needs.  We are at a point where the fractures are weakening what we can be as a profession.  When I was speaking on the leadership panel at AppraiserFest last year, that was the one thing I tried to get across.  Stop with the tribalism and fracturing into groups.  Stop trying to say your team is the only viable voice out there.  All valuation voices matter.

I think the answer is to start by being open to all the various groups out there and seeing the positives in each rather than the negatives.  Every professional group out there adds some positivity to the mix.  Whether you, as a valuation professional, are a member of a group or not we must see the value in a unified front.  Remember, that what we do for the US Economy is a thankless job.  One of our biggest user groups, lenders, are also one of the biggest groups that see what we do as an inconvenience rather than a protection of the public trust.  It seems with all the alternative valuation products that are constantly being pushed over traditional appraisals that they would rather see us replaced than to deal with us.

Within the organizations themselves the jockeying for individual position holds the organizations back from being truly great. The politics are cut throat and reward those seeking personal gain more than profession-oriented growth. Most of the long tenured organizations are a political nightmare that are more leadership driven than membership driven. I truly do not understand what one gets from hurting others in their jockeying for a position.  All this type of behavior does is make individual appraisers not want to participate, thus weakening both the organizations and the individuals.

What should we be doing?

The worst thing any of us can be doing is not participating in the profession.  Many, many folks are vocal on forums and social media yet have no membership or involvement with any organizations.  What good does it do to complain but do nothing?  There are lots of folks that want change to happen but that means you must get plugged in somewhere.  Anywhere.  Join a state coalition or one of the national organizations.  Sitting on the fence and complaining will get the profession, and you, nowhere.

If you have the time attend the meetings and add your voice to the mix.  Be opened minded when you are at these meetings and be open to changing your mind about some things.  Many of us that use social media get hard-headed about somethings and forget to listen.  What I notice with in-person meetings is that social graces tend to come back.  People are not so myopic in person (usually) and we tend to be politer in person.  On social media folks can sometimes lose their connection with manners.

Not one person reading this, or the knuckle-head writing this, knows everything.  If you are not open to discourse in a professional manner, then you may want to reassess yourself.  I have found myself feeling very strongly on certain things, only to find out later that I probably should have looked at it differently.  This is true of being a member of an organization.  No organization is perfect, and they all mess up time to time. All these organizations are run by people and people make mistakes.

Any valuation organization out there worth the cost of their membership should be doing multiple meetings with the other valuation organizations out there several times a year.  While we cannot expect them all to agree on all things, they need to be exchanging information and ideas.  Some sort of valuation congress.  Even the largest organizations have weaknesses that another organization can help with.  Some organizations are residentially focused where others are commercially focused.  That’s fine.  But each organization needs to accept that

What Should We Not Be Doing?

We are an opinionated lot.  We get paid to tell others our opinions, and we dig in like a tick when we make up our minds.  Many of us are great appraisers but we lack a true understanding of other things. We are a group of professionals that excel at market research that leads to supportable conclusions yet lack the same set of skills when it comes to the larger profession. I cannot tell you how many times I speak with colleagues that have some strong opinions about something related to the profession.  Then I find out that they have never read about or researched the topic at hand but had come to their seemingly strong opinion based on conjecture.  Often, they have heard another’s opinion on the topic and drawn a conclusion from hearsay. We must treat opinions from others like we do comparable sales data. Research it and find support for it, don’t just take the opinion as fact.

If we concentrate and expend energy on the negativity out there, we are taking energy away from doing something positive.  Those that seek to make money off us as professionals benefit form the distraction in-fighting creates.  While we spend time finding more reasons to fracture apart further, they continue making money off our work.  Some also are using that advantage to try and replace us.  It is okay to agree to disagree, it is not okay to try and attack someone just because they disagree with you.

Once you are involved with an organization do not put yourself before the whole.  Trying to earn a position at the expense of a colleague is not a good thing.  I have seen some colleagues turn into bullies and try to use politics to hurt others to gain a position or to unseat a colleague.  If that is your M.O. you are better off not getting involved.  Many need to ask themselves, “Are you trying to help out or is what you are doing going to hurt what the organization is doing?”

 

In the End

We are a small group of professionals.  There are, by my account, approximately 75,000 professionals nationwide.  We do not have the same lobbying power as the lenders out there.  To be honest, the only reason that we have lasted this long is that some legislators see the benefit that we add to protecting the national economy.  Since we are so small it is imperative that we cease the fracturing from within.  Find an organization that you can support and work with them.  Volunteer and stay involved.  Organizations cannot work against their members if the members do not become passive.  Passiveness is what has hurt the profession more than anything.  Well that and bad business practices, but that is another blog post for another time.

Find an organization, or a couple of them, to work with and volunteer to do some work.  Do not wait for someone else to try and solve your problems for you.  Sitting back and watching what others do will not work at all.  Between the different organizations out there look for ones that align with your thoughts and ones that seem open to you and your views.  Not every organization for everyone, and even after you lock into one, over time, you may find that someplace else ends up being a better place for you, for that time.

If you have limited time, find an organization that you can support and join.  Like anything, not everyone can always get really involved, but your support of the organization makes funds available to help the profession.

 

The Six Elements of Green Part 2 The First Two Elements

Now that we have talked about how important communication is between agents and the consumers and the agents and the appraisers, let’s get into the meat and potatoes, as they say. As an appraiser, one must be able to understand and identify high performance home (HPH) features.  As I eluded to in the first part of this series, green washing can be a real a problem in this space.  It is easy to add a few “green” features and have an agent advertise a home as being an HPH.

HPH or “green” homes are not just about saving energy.  To accomplish a truly HPH one must look at the “building as a whole” entity and not just the systems.  Another way to look at it is a “cradle-to the grave” approach, or from design phase of the home through the razing of it and returning to a site. What many appraisers and consumers don’t see immediately with HPH is how much more comfortable they are to live in.

The US Environmental Protection Agency describes green building below:

green building. The practice of creating structures and using processes that are environmentally responsible and resource-efficient throughout a building’s life-cycle from siting to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation, and deconstruction. This practice expands and complements the classical building design concerns of economy, utility, durability, and comfort. Green building is also known as sustainable or high-performance building.

So, what goes into looking at an HPH? I am glad that you asked.  Well, there are six elements[i]

  1. Site
  2. Water efficiency
  3. Energy efficiency
  4. Indoor air quality
  5. Materials
  6. Operations and maintenance

We are going to dig into the first two elements in this article.

 

site pic

Site

When I am contacted by builders or borrowers that want to maximize their values from creating an HPH, I spend some time discussing site orientation.  It is important.  Obviously the homesite will have a huge influence on the home.  The site will dictate what can be built. Location of the site within a market is a big deal.  Every site has pluses and minuses and from the concept of location, it can mean a long commute to the store or a short walk.

One of the tools that I use on my appraisals, and one that is available in many multiple listing systems (MLS) is walkscore.com. This metric will give you an idea of how “walkable” a location.  It takes into consideration distance to important market locations such as the downtown area of an MSA or shopping and retail areas.  The more “walkable” the property and the surrounding neighborhood are, the higher the score.

Site is not just about market area location, it is also about several other factors.  An important one is site orientation.  How a site is orientated, meaning how does it lie when considering north, south, east and west orientation can impact the building in significant ways.  Considering where the southern exposure of a home lies will affect the way solar energy interacts with the property.

Orientation, done correctly, can take advantage of passive solar technology. It can also minimize the amount of light that impacts the home through windows.  Solar radiation really does affect the indoor temperature, which mean sit can require more heating or cooling to accommodate too much or too little solar radiation. Orientation can also impact the availability of optimal solar PV system placement.  If done right, the site will allow better incorporation to the southern exposure for solar panels.

Drainage of the site is also an important consideration.  In areas that allow for cistern storage of rainwater this can help reduce the amount of water needed to water the lawn or other vegetation on the site.  Having less impervious surfaces that allow natural absorption and usage of water can enhance the “greenness” of the site.

Normally, educated builders and consumers will recognize the importance of site orientation and location right away.  It is important for appraisers to recognize it as well. Sometimes homeowners insist on placing the home in an odd orientation to maximize views.  Depending on what market you are in a mountain view or bay-view premium may trump a truly beneficial southern exposure vantage.  When both performance and view combat one another in a consumer’s mind, the appraiser must be aware and able to measure impact of the issue to the overall value of the home. With proper planning, there are usually acceptable compromises that can be incorporate din the design phase of the home.

water image

Water Efficiency

This element directly impacts the consumer’s monthly budget and because of that, it can be measured directly.  This element is more than low-volume toilets and installing low-flow faucet aerators.  It, like all things, require careful planning.  It also includes lessening the amount of water needed to water plants.  This can include rain barrels, cisterns, and the like.  There is also advantages to utilizing gray water; this is the waste water from the kitchen, tubs, washers, etc.  Everything except water that has been exposed to sewage.  As mentioned in the site planning portion, some local governments prohibit the use of rainwater. So as part of site planning, it may be necessary to choose to live someplace other than a rainwater restrictive location.

Some of the things that homeowners can do include the flowing items.  With retrofitting, one of the big water savers is finding and fixing any leaks.  Upgrading appliances to more efficient models.  This includes dishwashers and clothes washers.  Installing low flow faucets and toilets are another big water saver.  Utilizing the correct plants for your locality is a game changer as well.  The correct plants include using native species and other species that grow and live best in the climate where you are located.  This prevents the need to do extra watering.

Valuation Thoughts

The recognition of site attributes is not overly difficult but can be troubling for appraisers that have never seen or know about some of things that we have discussed thus far. Water efficiency technology may be easier to see if components are properly labeled. When you are not sure, ask questions.  The homeowners may be familiar with these types of improvements, as well as the agent or builder.  The best that an appraiser can hope for is that the homeowner and/or agent are up to speed as to what is present in the site and home.  Homeowners that built the home will most likely be pretty I enthusiastic to share, where as a homeowner that is the second, third or more homeowner after the build or retrofit may not be as aware of the features present.

What are some proactive ways to get more competent?  Take some classes. The Appraisal Institute offers three classes in sustainable residential properties. The AI also offers a list of appraisers that completed the program at Appraisal Institute’s Residential Registry for Sustainable Buildings.  Earth Advantage  also offers a three-day class on sustainable homes.  They also maintain a designation called the Accredited Green Appraiser (AGA). You can also affiliate with an appraiser that has experience in these types of homes.

We will get into some valuation methods in a later part of this series.  There are several tools in the tool box for appraisers that will prove familiar to most of us.  We will also discuss the very important Appraisal Institute Residential Green and Energy Efficient Addendum Form.  Another important topic we will discuss are the various home certifications out there in the markets.  Knowing what these are is extremely helpful.

[i] Residential Green Valuation Tools by Sandra Adomatis, SRA LEED GA

 

Experienced and New: A Review of Appraiserfest 2018

Originally posted at :

http://appraisersblogs.com/experienced-n-new-appraiserfest-review

Experienced and New: A Review of Appraiserfest 2018
By Tom Horn, SRA and Woody Fincham, SRA, AI-RRS, RAA Member of RAC

A Newbie Conference Attendee’s Take on Appraiserfest 2018
Tom Horn, SRA

I just got back from the first ever Appraiserfest conference, held in San Antonio, Texas, and while it is fresh on my mind I thought I would share my thoughts. This is my first national appraisal conference to attend and I have to say it did not disappoint.

I have been an appraiser for quite a while but have never been interested in spending my money or time to attend a conference that was not close by where I live. This may be the same way other appraisers think also but I hope this article gives you some insight into what happens at one of these conferences and what you can get out of it.

One analogy that I have heard about appraisers, and one that was mentioned at the conference, is that we are very similar to lone wolves. Many of us work by ourselves and we do not get a chance to talk with other appraisers whenever we need another professional’s opinion.

Ithink one of the messages that the conference wanted to get across is that appraisers must try and shake off this mentality. We must try and go from lone wolves to a pack of wolves. It is only through this transition that we will be able to affect change at the national level because there is strength in numbers.

This change can start at the most basic level, like that offered by social media groups. One of these groups that comes to mind is the 100% Appraiser Group, started and ran by appraiser Mark Skapinetz. I truly believe that this conference would not have been as strong as it was without the camaraderie that this group has built, or at least the friendships that appraisers have developed online.

The natural progression of these online friendships is to move them offline and in person. Taking this a step further these relationships also develop into state appraisal coalitions that have been so effective over the past several years. Again, when appraisers work together like this it becomes a more effective method for communicating with government officials to get things changed in a positive way for the appraisal industry.

The underlying themes for Appraiserfest 2018 included:

  1. Finding alternative forms of appraisal work that do not involve lenders
  2. Making yourself the local expert by analyzing the market and reporting your findings to other local real estate professionals
  3. Being aware of antitrust laws so that you stay out of trouble
  4. Learning as much as you can about your state appraisal laws in order to avoid mortgage fraud
  5. Educating ourselves on the new technologies such as blockchain so that we can position ourselves as valuation experts
  6. Staying on top of the main economic indicators so that we can plan for market changes in our businesses
  7. Learning how to use social media to our advantage in order to grow our non lender business and finally
  8. Thinking differently about the current real estate appraisal model by providing value to consumers by helping them manage the equity of their largest asset, their home.

In addition to getting value from the above noted curriculum the ‘fest also provided great value in other ways also. The friendships that were built online were taken offline and strengthened even more. While I don’t have any other national appraisal conference to compare it to I have attended regional or local get togethers and this was much different.

This gathering had a special vibe to it because everyone seemed to already have a bond with each other because of their online communications. It was this aspect of the ‘fest that I believe sets it apart from all others.

A very special part of the weekend involved a ceremony that honored all of the appraisers that had served in the military. Each of their names were displayed on the big screen and they were all given medals. This was an emotional time for everyone attending.

Everyone in the group has a genuine love for appraising and the desire to continue providing value and help to consumers, because without an unbiased third party involved in the mortgage transaction this could negatively affect the national economy.

So, my final thought about Appraiserfest 2018 is that I would definitely attend another one because the value received was so much more than the cost and time involved and the 14 hours of continuing education doesn’t hurt either. If I can answer any questions about attending the ‘fest feel free to contact me.

An Experienced Conference Attendee’s Perspective
Woody Fincham. SRA, AI-RRS, RAA Member of RAC

Appraiserfest 2018 has ended. I admit it, I was a skeptic that it would ever happen. Not only did it happen but is was an astonishing success.

Wow, what an experience. I think all of us that attended had a bit of withdrawal when we got home. This is one of many valuation conferences that I have attended in my career. It was certainly different than most. This was my sixth and final one this year. Appraiserfest is a different beast than what most appraisers would be familiar with. It is not just one stuffy panel after another. Pretentiousness was checked at the door and we were all simply appraisers working towards a single goal. That goal being successful valuation practice.

Starting out, the energy was vibrant.  Everyone that attended expressed how much positive energy they felt there. In a time where residential appraisers feel isolated and preyed upon by lenders, AMCs and GSEs, this conference helped turn some frowns upside down. The networking was excellent. I was able to meet many appraisers that I have emailed with or spoken to on the phone or exchanged correspondence with over social media. It was great to shake hands and get hugs from folks I have befriended over the last few years.

The introductions that were done included music, video and lots of pumping up the crowd. The leadership that put together the fest did it right. Phil Crawford has a great ability to interact with the crowd, very personable. Mark Skapinetz “Skap” is well…Mark, it is hard not to love the guy. They keep saying this is a “Happening”, it was more like a “Skapening”. He is certainly a genuine person who wants to see good things happen for all of us as professionals. Lori Noble, as we say in the south, was certainly the belle of the ball. Everyone, Phil and Mark included, had such wonderful things to say about her and it seems she was the glue holding much of it together. These three deserve all the accolades for getting this thing to work.

A personal highlight for me was being able to sit on a leadership panel with Mike Ford, Maureen Sweeney, George Dell, John Russell, Jonathan Miller and Jim Park. It was neat to see the crowd from the stage. It was a perspective only a few of us got. The biggest take away for me sitting up there: Appraiserfest is a diverse group. The number of women appraisers that attended seems much higher in comparison to other conferences that I have attended. That is great!

Over the next couple of days there were a slew of great presenters and lots of networking. I walked away with dozens of business cards. That is always a great thing about attending conferences and classes in person.  You can meet folks and not feel like you are an island unto yourself. Many of us are single appraiser entities and we forget that there is strength in fellowship and unity. I mean the Fest even brought David Samnick back to the 100% Appraiser Facebook page. Many missed his “As the Liver Turns” posts, I am glad to see that he is back as well.

I will certainly be attending the next one, and I hope to be a part of the leadership and presenters again. I do hope to see a larger cross section of the profession at the next one. I was surprised at the absence of the Appraisal Institute. This was a large gathering of residential appraisers and this would have been a great platform for the AI to reach out and talk with the boots on the ground appraisers out there. Maybe next year.

So now you have a new conference attendee’s perspective from my friend, Tom Horn. (By the way, I had never met Tom in person, it was great to finally do so.) He liked what he saw at the Fest. You have my perspective from a veteran conference attendee, and I have no issue saying it is unlike anything else out there. It is worthy of your time and resources to attend next year.

Going Concern Valuer in Virginia

placer
Courtesy H.Placer

Heather M. Placer, MAI, SRA, CCIM, IFAS, ASA is an appraiser located in Midlothian, Virginia. Heather is a career long appraiser that got started at an early age.  She volunteers her time to the Appraisal Institute (AI) and is currently the president of the Virginia Commonwealth Chapter of the Appraisal institute.  It would require too much space to list everything that she does and is a part of with the AI.  Heather is also the lead non-residential appraiser on our Virginia team for our company, Valucentric.  As well as Vice-President of the company. She is also an active commercial real estate agent.

 

VN:  How long have you been in the profession?

HP: 25 years (started in 1993 as an assistant to an appraiser)

 

VN: What is your favorite thing about the profession?

HP: I love the flexibility of my hours and the challenges of the assignments.  I also like visiting different businesses and learning about how they are successful.  One of the most interesting things is talking to small business owners and seeing what makes them successful.

 

VN: Who are your mentors and idols within the profession?

HP: Any of our leaders at the Appraisal Institute have been exceptional.  Scott Robinson, MAI, SRA, AI-RRS, AI-GRS our most recent past president, did a great job at trying to get younger people into the profession.  We have a number of professionals coming up that exemplify the passion we need to continue moving the industry forward.

 

VN: What are some of your passions inside the profession?

HP:  I am really interested in going concerns-anything that seems strange or odd in the commercial world fascinates me.

 

VN: What are some passions of yours outside of the profession?

HP: I am also a commercial sales agent.  I recently earned my CCIM.  That has been a different experience.  I also enjoy teaching.  In my downtime I have a passion for anything with water and my next goal is to buy a lake house.

 

VN: Where do you see the profession in 3 years?  5 years?  10 years?

HP: As technology continues to impact the profession I think that in 3/5/10 years the most successful appraisers will be those that can specialize in one area and those that have earned their designations.

 

VN: What is one thing about your personal business that you are most proud?

HP: I have spent a considerable amount of time studying vineyards.  I am really enjoying branching out into assignment types that many appraisers do not like.

 

VN: If you could change one thing about your business model what would it be?

HP: I would try to get away from the standard “cookie cutter” bank work

 

VN:  What are some present goals for you and what you do are doing in the valuation space?

HP: I am working on really trying to learn more about the going concern models.  I want to continue to build a database to get a good foundation of multipliers and other ratios to contribute to the study of separating intangible components.

 

VN:   If you could change one thing in valuation, what would it be?

HP: Doing away with AVM’s and banks that think they can apply a standardized model to our profession.  This is not an industry that can be automated.

 

VN:  What advice would you give someone just getting in the profession?

HP: You may have to make less the first two years while you are training but it will be worth it

 

VN: This last one is for you to discuss or talk about whatever you would like.

HP: I cannot stress enough the importance of continuing to take education, whether you are new in the business or a seasoned veteran.   This industry changes continuously; the best appraisers are the ones that continue to keep up with these changes.

 

 

*****

There you have it folks.  Heather is a testament to what education and hard work can get you.  She has vigorously chased and earned several designations.  I have personally done several assignments with her and she knows value.